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Modern Shift shared an Experience

Share the Holiday Spirit by donating or volunteering to help people in need.

The Center for Domestic Peace

http://www.centerfordomesticpeace.org/donate-now

Marin Abused Women's Services

Executive Director Donna Garske's organization has been helping domestic violence victims for 30 years

Marin’s response to domestic violence was once the response found elsewhere in the country—silence. Abused women had nowhere to turn. Law enforcement agencies were loath to get involved in what they perceived as a household matter. Prosecution was almost nonexistent.

Today, the situation has improved greatly, thanks in large part to the efforts of Marin Abused Women’s Services. The 30-year-old San Rafael organization has helped thousands of women rebuild their lives. That’s not to say domestic violence is no longer a problem in Marin; it ...

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Share the Holiday Spirit by donating or volunteering to help people in need.

The Center for Domestic Peace

http://www.centerfordomesticpeace.org/donate-now

Marin Abused Women's Services

Executive Director Donna Garske's organization has been helping domestic violence victims for 30 years

Marin’s response to domestic violence was once the response found elsewhere in the country—silence. Abused women had nowhere to turn. Law enforcement agencies were loath to get involved in what they perceived as a household matter. Prosecution was almost nonexistent.

Today, the situation has improved greatly, thanks in large part to the efforts of Marin Abused Women’s Services. The 30-year-old San Rafael organization has helped thousands of women rebuild their lives. That’s not to say domestic violence is no longer a problem in Marin; it is — 12,000 local women (more than one out of every 10) will be beaten in their homes this year, and 30 percent of the women who seek treatment in Marin’s emergency rooms are battered.

Regardless of the statistics, says LeeAnn Bartolini, chair of the nonprofit’s board of directors, the stereotype persists that domestic violence doesn’t happen in affluent Marin. “We still hear that, 30 years later: ‘It’s not a problem in Marin County,’” she says. Or people think “‘it only happens in the Canal area; it only happens with poor people,’”

executive director Donna Garske says.

But domestic abuse plays no socioeconomic or racial favorites. In fact, wealthy women can be particularly vulnerable, Garske notes. The stakes are high for them: report an abusive husband and risk losing your social and financial standing. If they do report the abuse and seek divorce, their husbands have enough money to prolong legal proceedings for years.

Marin Abused Women’s Services offers two 24-hour hotlines, a 16-bed emergency shelter, transitional housing for women and their children, support groups, advocacy services and accompaniment to court proceedings, all with bilingual support for Spanish speakers. In its three decades of operation, the group has aided more than 130,000 women and 28,000 men.

The men’s program, ManKind, focuses on ending violent behavior. More than 75 percent of its graduates who are on probation for domestic violence do not get re-arrested four years after graduation, one of the best such statistics in the country. A parallel effort, WomanKind, exists for abusive women.

With an annual budget of $3.1 million (three quarters from the government, the rest from donations and grants), the organization has come a long way from its beginnings in 1977 when several local members of the National Organization of Women noticed that Marin lacked a way to help victims of domestic abuse and their families. They set up the group’s first 24-hour hotline, whose volunteers talked with abused women and regularly arranged to remove them from danger by picking them up in the middle of the night.

At first, lacking a shelter, the group relied on the generosity of family and friends to temporarily house these domestic refugees. “We would say, ‘We just need your basement for a couple of days,’” says board member Pat Assimakis, one of the founders. Within two years, the group had purchased a shelter but still had to persuade authorities—and the community at large—that domestic abuse was an issue worth paying attention to.

Over the years, the organization and its allies helped change both public perception and the law, until domestic violence became recognized as a crime. Now the group works with law enforcement, the district attorney’s office and other authorities to help abused women.

Yet clearly its biggest impact is personal—a fact evident in the success stories of those who were helped. Consider Tara. She was an accomplished mechanic when she met her husband. Once they married, though, he took over her life, refusing to let her work, isolating her from friends and family and controlling her finances. He beat her every day. Finally, seven months pregnant, she left, fleeing with her three-year-old daughter and finding her way to the Marin Abused Women’s Services emergency shelter. The organization helped her navigate the court system, arranged to have her accompanied to the doctor, and gave her transportation money so she could move in with a relative.

A letter from another woman summarizes how the organization helps people begin life anew. “We were saved by the women’s shelter,” it reads. “We had a chance to heal our mental and physical damages with all sources of help.… We were empowered again to see our strength and rebuild our positive minds and confidence. We were gently guided to overcome our difficulties, to find educational programs and to get job training. The program rebuilt our fragile family after we left our domestic violence home. Now we try to stand up again as a new family.”

BY SAMANTHA BRONSON

Original Source

http://www.marinmagazine.com/February-2008/Marin-Abused-Womens-Services/

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Holiday Spirit, Give Back, women, Kids, family, Volunteer

Ezra Migel shared an Event

Where: Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, United States.
Anytime

VOLUNTEER BEACH CLEANUP - San Francisco

VOLUNTEER BEACH CLEANUP - San Francisco

Start 2015 giving back. Help keep Ocean Beach in top condition by volunteering for a shore cleanup. The city's largest beach is loved by surfers, bonfire-lovers, kite flyers, dogs, and pretty much every other San Francisco resident for its foggy beauty, even if the water can be (is always) frigid.

Where: Ocean Beach

When:

Ocean Beach cleanups happen on the first and third Sundays of each month. Meet at Stairwell 17.

10:00-12:00

Original Source

http://sosh.com


Ezra Migel commented on this Event

New Year, New Years Resolution, Give Back, Volunteer, GoSF

kyle shared an Event

27 Where: 555 Northgate Dr, San Rafael, CA 94903, United States.
When: Dec, 27, 2014 09:00 am

Divorce Options Marin workshop CP Cal and Collaborative Practice Marin

Divorce Options Marin workshop CP Cal and Collaborative Practice Marin

A community service sponsored by Collaborative Practice California

If you are facing divorce or separation ...

attend a Divorce Options™ workshop, a low-cost public education workshop offered monthly in many counties across California.You have choices!

How a Divorce Options™ Workshop Can Help You

Divorce Options™ will help you understand and manage the legal, financial and emotional aspects of this challenging life transition.

Divorce Options™ will help you explore your options and make informed decisions about which process will most likely lead to your desired outcomes.

Divorce Options™ will help you take control of your divorce and move forward with your life, with guidance from trained professionals in law, finance and counseling.


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workshop, collaborative divorce, legal, Advice

A Modern Shift member shared an Experience

Whoa... How many days till Christmas???

Whoa... How many days till Christmas???

Jon Smith commented on this Experience

nervous breakdown

Jon Smith shared an Event

Where: 1000 5th Ave, New York, NY 10028, United States.
Anytime

Artful Rooftop Bar at the Metropolitan Museum of Art - NYC

Artful Rooftop Bar at the Metropolitan Museum of Art - NYC

Where art, culture and great views come together: the Cantor Roof Garden on top of the Metropolitan Museum of Art really is something special. With a different sculpture exhibition every summer (Jeff Koons and Roy Lichtenstein have been previous subjects), it’s perfect for sipping drinks in the sunshine with both amazing artistic sights and bird’s-eye views of Central Park for company. For those who see their art best on a full stomach, the RoofGarden Cafe serves cocktails and snacks

WHERE

Metropolitan Museum of Art

1000 5th Ave

New York, NY 10028

(212) 535-7710

http://www.metmuseum.org/

WHEN

Tuesday - Thursday 10:00am - 4:30pm

Friday - Saturday 10:00am - 8:00pm

Original Source

http://www.scenebylaurie.com/nyc-scene/bars/the-five-best-rooftop-bars-in-new-york-city/


Ezra Migel commented on this Event

GoNYC, Arts and Entertainment, Events New York

Jon Smith shared an Experience

Jon Smith just told us...

Ok… This a great idea for a Christmas present!!

Hint Hint…

The Trunk Club

https://www.trunkclub.com/gifts?c=search_AW_LocalTargetingComp_Sitelink_GiftCards&gclid=CPTm8Ye4ucICFQqIfgod2KwAuQ

Jon Smith just told us...



Ok… This a great idea for a Christmas present!! 

Hint Hint… 

The T...

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Dad, Him, Retail Therapy, Shopping

Modern Shift shared an Experience


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inspration, hero journey, documentary

Modern Shift shared an Experience

Beyonce

Ring Off

http://youtu.be/Lz0cVmsRhk4


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beyonce, music, divorce

Modern Shift shared a Question

Where should I go for a sunny solo holiday?

Where should I go for a sunny solo holiday?

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ocean, traveling alone, adventure, woman

A Modern Shift member shared an Experience

Leandra Medine

APRIL 9, 2014

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

PINTEREST

Three months ago, the founder of a website, who I had recently met, cc’ed me on an e-mail correspondence with his assistant. He was trying to introduce us and in doing so, made the mistake of not deleting their previous conversation thread. I scrolled down and noticed that he’d confirmed to her that I was “verrrrrrrry funny. Smart, too.” This made me feel wonderful. But as I kept reading, there it was.

“She is ugly as fuck tho. Truly a man repeller.”

My initial reaction was to laugh — chiefly because it seemed incredibly unusual if not highly offensive that he would describe a fellow woman to his female assistant as “ugly as fuck.”

But then I got emotional. Ugly as fuck? Really? And that was the chaser for a descriptive clause that pegged me not just smart but funn...

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Leandra Medine

APRIL 9, 2014

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

PINTEREST

Three months ago, the founder of a website, who I had recently met, cc’ed me on an e-mail correspondence with his assistant. He was trying to introduce us and in doing so, made the mistake of not deleting their previous conversation thread. I scrolled down and noticed that he’d confirmed to her that I was “verrrrrrrry funny. Smart, too.” This made me feel wonderful. But as I kept reading, there it was.

“She is ugly as fuck tho. Truly a man repeller.”

My initial reaction was to laugh — chiefly because it seemed incredibly unusual if not highly offensive that he would describe a fellow woman to his female assistant as “ugly as fuck.”

But then I got emotional. Ugly as fuck? Really? And that was the chaser for a descriptive clause that pegged me not just smart but funny, which had to mean looking at my face for the course of our 30 minute conversation was as painful as say, getting a colonoscopy without the preliminary anesthesia.

As recently as two months ago, I noticed that the details of my makeup regimen (or lack thereof) have become something of a hot topic on the Man Repeller Instagram feed. I’ve chalked up the cause of conversation to either people taking notice of the fact that I don’t wear very much makeup or to my taking notice of their having taken notice.

The comments sometimes appear as compound questions like, “you could be cute but why don’t you wear makeup?” Other times they’re just plain insulting. As recently as last week, I’ve been called an ugly whore (not so far off from “as fuck”) which seems really inconsistent with the Man Repeller ethos seeing as we don’t typically sell bodies — we sell ideas.

That and clothes.

But have I started to notice the criticism because of that website founder? And what has that awareness elicited intrinsically?

It occurred to me last month when I was laying in bed beside my mother in a hotel room in Milan, trolling my own comment feed and half lamenting, half giggling about the abundance of distraught comments over the state of my face that maybe I should wear makeup. Something so simple that my mother said, so benign and innocent, so obvious, released a trigger in me.

“Makeup is meant to enhance the natural beauty of a woman, Leandra, so, really, why wouldn’t you use it?”

I contemplated her question for a moment but frankly, the answer is simple.

I’m not making a statement. I’m not trying to act like the most extreme, hyper-literal and violent version of a man repeller. If you read this site you know by now that Man Repelling is an attitude. It is a state of existence. It is not whether you do your hair or curl your lashes, or even what you wear. It is how you approach doing those things. Why you do those things, and perhaps most importantly, it is a love letter to individuality, which is something that manifests itself in plentifully different ways.

So the reason I don’t wear makeup is because I am lazy. And don’t get me wrong — I am as much a sucker for the newest “anti-aging miracle cream” as the next guy. Just because I don’t wear much makeup doesn’t mean I don’t believe in good skin. I want to know that if I don’t wash my face, I won’t tarnish my pillow. I don’t want to see the ingredients that constructed my previous night’s visage wiped off into a towel. I also read somewhere that if you sleep with mascara on your lashes they are 70% more likely to fall out so as far as I’m concerned, maintaining real lashes that aren’t quite as plump as they can be is ten times more compelling than having none at all.

More important than that though, I am comfortable with how I look. I don’t hate what I see when I look in the mirror. Even if legions of others don’t agree. I have accepted the reflection that reliably bounces back at me for its perks and its flaws. I understand that there are thick, dark circles under my eyes. I have grown to appreciate them. I have noticed that my nose grows a little hookier on a near-monthly basis. That’s fine. I know there are wrinkles ready to stake their claim as full time residents on my forehead any moment now. My dad has those, too, and I find that endearing.

My eyes will never be blue, my bone structure will never allow for you to mistake me for a Scandinavian model. I am who I am and even if that infers “ugly as fuck,” I think it’s, I don’t know, beautiful.

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Leandra Medine

APRIL 9, 2014

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

PINTEREST

Three months ago, the founder of a...

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manrepeller, makeup, beauty